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On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove


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Old 11-16-2011, 09:01 PM   #1
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Default On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

David Grove is responsible for writing one of two Friday the 13th retrospective book released in 2005 titled, "Making Friday the 13th". Now he is in the middle of writing a new book focusing soley on the original slasher/who-done-it. David has been updating me and my website on this new project for the last couple of months and recently sent this new update.

"Just updating you that I'm almost finished with the body of the manuscript for my "Friday the 13th" book - tentatively titled "On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th" - after which I'll proofread then add the appendix section which will include, among other things, the first five pages and the last five pages of the 85 page shooting script that was used during filming, as well as a copy of the shooting schedule."

For more info on the progress of the book, check out a previous story with a little more background on the book.

http://www.fridaythe13thfranchise.co...roves-new.html

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Old 11-17-2011, 09:03 PM   #2
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

I am interested in this book. Many people tend to favor the sequels just because of the Jason character. The original often gets over looked just because it doesn't have Jason in it, but I see it as a better movie then all of the sequels.

I am glad that Dave is showing the original film the respect it truely deserves.
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Old 04-05-2012, 03:41 PM   #3
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

There have been a few updates on this book since last year. The release date will be October 2012 and currently David Grove is asking the fans what they would like to see on the cover of the book....

http://www.fridaythe13thfranchise.co...cation-in.html
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:32 PM   #4
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

I had some little input on the first book. A few pictures and background information.
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Old 08-05-2013, 08:01 PM   #5
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Default NEW BOOK: ON LOCATION IN BLAIRSTOWN: THE MAKING OF FRIDAY THE 13TH

Hello. My name's David and I'm the author of the upcoming book On location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th, which comes out on September 13.

Here's a description:

On location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th covers the creation, planning and filming of the iconic 1980 film Friday the 13th in a way that no other film has been documented before. Through the memories and recollections of the cast and crew, many speaking for the first (and last) time, the book takes the reader "on location" for the filming of "Friday the 13th" and behind the scenes for all the adventures, conflicts and dramas that went into the making of one of the most popular horror films in history.

I'd be happy to answer any questions about the book that any of you might have. The retail price is 24.99, but of course many retailers will probably discount that.

Thank you.

David Grove.
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Old 08-06-2013, 01:40 AM   #6
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

David,

Thanks for visiting the community! I'm more than positive you will find plenty of people more than wanting to talk about the book!

I merged your thread with the thread we already had opened for this topic so that people can see your post more clearly.

Enjoy your discussion and your time on the forum!
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Old 08-30-2013, 03:19 PM   #7
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

Here's the cover art for the book...

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Old 09-06-2013, 03:12 PM   #8
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Default Review of On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th

http://www.mantaraypictures.com/OnLo...Blairstown.htm

On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday The 13th

By David Grove

AuthorMike Dark Ink – 2013
ISBN: 978-0988446823
$24.99, 226 pages

Crystal Lake Memories was a big beautiful book about the entire Friday The 13th movie series. I loved it. But if you are a true fan of the box office killing first film Friday The 13th, then you positively must get this new book On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday The 13th.

David Grove (who’s written a bunch of other books, including the outstanding Jamie Lee Curtis: Scream Queen) pulls out all the stops to tell the full production story of Sean S. Cunningham’s hugely successful slasher. If you are like me, I can never get too much information on how a film was made, especially one as dear to my heart as Friday The 13th.

Grove has somehow tracked down most of the cast and crew, including investors & distributor personnel to compile the history of this often copied film. He tells exactly what happened before, during and after the Blairstown, New Jersey shoot. He takes you not only to Camp-No-Be-Bo-Sco but downtown Blairstown and the surrounding shooting locations. You'll be transported back inside the hotels, restaurants where the cast and crew were lodged. The author chronicles the relationships made during the shoot and their interaction since.

You’ll read about how the initial idea came to Sean Cunningham. You'll discover the development of the script and exactly who was responsible for writing it.

One of the things I found most interesting about this tome was that in no way was this film a creative endeavor for Sean Cunningham. After coming off the luke-warm performance of two children-oriented family films, Cunningham needed something to be successful. He re-mortgaged his house and put all his chips on the table for this film. I’ve always said a desperate director is dangerous because they put everything into making it a success.

Cunningham didn’t really want to work again with the three investors from Boston (originally called Hallmark Releasing then Georgetown Productions). But there was nobody else that was willing to fund the project. In fact, at one crucial point Cunningham decided not to work with them, only to change his mind the next morning (after a sleepless night) and caught them right before they were going to invest their money into another venture.

Grove then takes you through the location scouting and casting of the movie. Betsy Palmer came aboard mid-way through the shoot after the first four actresses either couldn’t commit or come to a financial agreement. This is particularly noteworthy because Palmer knocked the role out of the park and it became the most identifiable performance of her long career.
Cunningham’s choice to re-team with Director of Photography Barry Abrams (who had shot Cunningham's previous films Manny’s Orphans & Here Come the Tigers) was probably one of the top-five things he did in terms of how good the film turned out. Finding Camp No-Be-Bo-Sco proved the perfect place to set the counselors up for fun times and later isolated terror.


Hiring Tom Savini, fresh off his work on George A. Romero’s Dawn of the Dead, was critically an important move on the filmmaker’s part. Savini ended up creating ingenious splatter effects that have terrorized a worldwide audience ever since. Not only that but Savini crafted the iconic mongoloid look of young Jason Voorhees and even gave the low-budget film a big shot in the arm with stunt work it could not have afforded otherwise.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading the intricate details of the entire principal photography phase. What scenes were shot on what day-week (the shooting schedule and some of the script comes as a bonus) was invaluable to me. About 10 years ago, I visited Blairstown and the Boy Scout camp, so I have first had knowledge of the locations. While reading about the shoot, I could imagine where the cast & crew made this movie. This volume is the closest thing to being there thirty-four years after the fact.

The wealth of information about cast and crew on set provides for some fascinating stories, most of which I’ve never seen or heard in any other media platform. On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday The 13th is easily the most comprehensive authority on the history of how Friday The 13th as made.

Grove updates us with what everyone has gone on to do since making this classic.

This is a lightning quick read. In fact, the quickest written work I’ve read this year. On a scaled to one to ten, with ten being the best, this would get the max score.

If you only purchase one book the rest of this year, then I’d make On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday The 13th your choice. The fact the book will hit stores on Friday September 13th is totally cool and wise date by the publisher.

www.AuthorMikeDarkInk.com
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Old 09-09-2013, 11:11 PM   #9
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

This is in stock at Amazon. I just ordered one and should get it this Thursday or Friday.
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Old 09-14-2013, 02:00 AM   #10
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

http://www.joblo.com/horror-movies/n...riday-the-13th

PLOT: On location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th covers the creation, planning and filming of the iconic 1980 film, Friday the 13th in a way that no other film has been documented before. Through the memories of the cast and crew, many speaking for the first (and last) time, as well as previously-undiscovered production information and materials, On location in Blairstown takes the reader "on location" and back in time to 1979 for the filming of Friday the 13th and behind the scenes for all of the adventures, conflicts and dramas that went into the making of one of the most enduring and popular horror films in history.
REVIEW: Do we really need another making-of FRIDAY THE 13th book? That was my initial thought after learning of the existence of ON LOCATION IN BLAIRSTOWN: THE MAKING OF FRIDAY THE 13th. After all, most of the behind-the-scenes action of the seminal 1980 horror film is already well known to horror aficionados, mostly thanks to the splendid CRYSTAL LAKE MEMORIES book by Peter M. Bracke released in 2006, which exhaustively covered the entire franchise from every angle. Nevertheless, my fondness for all things Voorhees overruled my skepticism and I asked for an advanced copy; after all, how can you know too much about the massacres at Camp Crystal Lake?

The good news is, ON LOCATION IN BLAIRSTOWN is certainly an enjoyable, informative read for FRIDAY fans. Wisely, it focuses solely on the first film - everything from the development, to the casting, to the production and eventual release is combed through thoroughly. Author David Grove sees fit to give us plenty of backstory leading up to film's creation, making Sean S. Cunningham the protagonist and documenting his "rise" from the theater world to sexploitation filmmaker (working for a potentially mobbed-up theater chain, no less) to the forger of one of horror cinema's most recognizable titles. (Of course, it just started with a title.) Grove also includes a somewhat melancholy post-FRIDAY THE 13th examination of how Cunningham's career, inextricably linked to the slasher, never quite took off; naturally, the same could be said regarding most of the cast, plenty of whom Grove has interviewed for the book.

Grove goes through every phase of the film chronologically, with chapters devoted to "Week One" of filming, "Week Two", "Week Three," etc. Practically every sequence in the film is examined: that funny scene where Officer Dorf comes by to tell the counselors to keep things quiet? Gets two full pages. Jack (Kevin Bacon) and Marcie's (Jeannine Taylor) sex scene before Jack's death? It's well covered. (Taylor talks about "inwardly cringing" during it.) Jason's rise from the lake? Covered to death... Even shooting Steve Christy's brief scene in the Blairstown diner is dissected, if only because lighting the place was a tricky proposition for the crew. You get the idea: this book will not leave you wanting for any morsel of information regarding the movie's construction.

As many know, Blairstown is the quiet, rural town in New Jersey where the majority of FRIDAY was shot, and the book does its due diligence by examining every aspect of the location shoot itself (even going so far as to interview the town's former fire chief). Tales of raucous cast-and-crew parties at the rundown truck stop hotel where they were lodged are amusing (they were apparently enjoying beer-and-egg breakfasts regularly), as well as interesting tidbits about the many characters on the location as well(make-up maestro Tom Savini's crazy on-set shenanigans weren't always met with enthusiasm, for example). If you've always wanted to know the backstory of FRIDAY THE 13th's director of photography or key grip, this is the book for you. Similarly every actor in the film is given a large portion of the spotlight so that we know exactly who they were before making that fateful journey to the camp.

The book contains some juicy gossip as well. Did you know that Cunningham - married at the time - and leading lady Adrienne King had an affair on set? Furthermore, King would actually help Cunningham stage scenes, which led to plenty of resentment from the cast and crew alike. The set was more like an summer camp than you could imagine.

It's hard to complain about much here; some of the photos are small and repetitive, but that's not a drawback, considering the book is not being put out by a major publishing house. (I suppose it's hard to stack up against the beautiful color pages of CRYSTAL LAKE MEMORIES.) Not unlike the movie, ON LOCATION IN BLAIRSTOWN feels like a labor of love done by someone without a ton of money but a lot of ingenuity and persistence. It's the definitive behind-the-scenes look at the ultimate summertime slasher movie, and fans of the series, and of the genre in general, will not at all be disappointed.

Rating: 9 out of 10.

ORDER YOUR COPY OF "ON LOCATION IN BLAIRSTOWN RIGHT HERE!
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Old 09-14-2013, 02:11 AM   #11
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

Mine arrived in the mail this afternoon. I'm pretty wiped out from today, and tomorrow is going to be busy. I'll probably dig into it on Sunday. Looking forward to it! Always good to have a new Friday the 13th goodie.
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Old 09-15-2013, 05:42 AM   #12
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

I am interested in hearing people's reviews and thoughts on this book. I have Grove's first Friday documentary book and there was some nice information in there, and then a lot of rehashing - almost like an abridged novelisation - of the films which... If you're reading a documentary book, you already know what has happened.

Is this book like the first? Some information and some re-telling?
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Old 09-15-2013, 03:24 PM   #13
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

http://www.cinemaretro.com/index.php...VID-GROVE.html

BOOK REVIEW: "ON LOCATION IN BLAIRSTOWN: THE MAKING OF FRIDAY THE 13TH" BY DAVID GROVE

By Todd Garbarini

Horror film fans tend to have very memorable impressions of when they saw a thriller that impacted them strongly. On Friday, May 9, 1980, I watched the John Guillermin 1976 version of King Kong on a rerun on NBC-TV and eagerly discussed it the following day with my Boy Scout troupe on our way into New York to visit the United Nations building. Walking through the New York streets was quite an education in many ways, not the least of which was our journey through the theater district along 42nd Street. On the way, we saw movie marquee displays for pornographic movies (yikes!!) and comedies such as Don Adams’ The Nude Bomb. Friday the 13th had just opened up the previous day, and a theater displayed lobby cards depicting images from the film. One of them contained an image of a woman screaming at a man who had been impaled on a wall with arrows. This was the first time I had seen such a graphic image and it really made me wonder what the rest of the movie consisted of. I remember being really disturbed by it. It would be another seven years before I would see Friday the 13th on a local television station airing and I must admit that I found the film to be mediocre at best. John Carpenter's Halloween (1978), which I had seen five years earlier, was more my cup of tea. I found that film to be truly gripping and tense. Years later I caught up with the DVD release of Friday the 13th, however, my reaction was still the same. I suppose if I had seen the film when I was considerably younger it quite possibly would have terrified me. One person it did terrify was author David Grove, one of the world’s foremost authorities on this watershed horror film. He was just nine years-old when he caught a local television airing of the film. He hasn't been the same since!


On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th is the excellent new book by Mr. Grove which should delight fans of the first in this now (in)famous horror film franchise. Illustrated with nearly 300 black and white photos and written with the cooperation of people both in front of and behind the camera, the book is an in-depth look at the making of a film that made horror fans out of young kids. What is remarkable is that they (like Yours Truly) are still horror film fans to this day. It appears to be a life-long love that doesn’t waver. If you have read the excellent behind-the-scenes look at Steven Spielberg’s Jaws (1975) in JAWS: Memories from Martha’s Vineyard, this book is the product of the same labor of love.


Extremely well researched, the book takes the reader through the film's humble beginnings in 1979, from getting the cast and crew together, the script revisions to the final draft, to the start of filming the day after Labor Day in September. The author draws parallels between the film and the aforementioned predecessor, Halloween, and also points out the differences between the two.


The bulk of the book takes the reader to the actual physical locations where the film was shot. As a traveler who loves to go to the locations where my favorite horror movies were made, I only discovered roughly five years ago that this film had been shot in my home state of New Jersey! Yes, the Internet is a wonderful tool. Armed with screenshots from the film and directions from Google Maps, a friend of mine and I sought out as many of the locations that are covered in this book, with the exception of Camp NoBeBoSco, better known in the film as Camp Crystal Lake. Camp NoBeBoSco, where the bulk of the story takes place, is actually a Boy Scout camp, and I only got as far as the entrance. I have read about and heard from friends that the inhabitants of this camp do not appreciate outsiders trying to sneak in and have a look around, despite the film’s popularity. You would think that they would set it up so that people could pay to stay there; I would think that they would make a killing (pun most definitely intended). Then again, the camp would require an enormous amount of upkeep as a result of the inevitable visitors who would try to dismantle and take pieces of the remaining cabins as souvenirs!


Special makeup effects artist Tom Savini created what remains of Jason Voorhees, the poor soul who drowned at the hands of distracted camp sitters. He speaks at length of his experiences on the film. The book also nicely discusses where the cast ended up following the film’s wrap and subsequent release.


I may not be a fan of Friday the 13th, but I have to acknowledge its place in the history of the horror genre and give kudos to Mr. Grove for having written such an interesting, in-depth look at the making of this film. As a result of his tremendous efforts, I am going to revisit the film with a different point of view. My appreciation for Friday the 13th and director Sean Cunningham’s inexorable quest to get it made has grown as a result of this book.


A must-have for Friday the 13th completists and horror film fans alike.
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Old 09-15-2013, 09:48 PM   #14
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andiac View Post
I am interested in hearing people's reviews and thoughts on this book. I have Grove's first Friday documentary book and there was some nice information in there, and then a lot of rehashing - almost like an abridged novelisation - of the films which... If you're reading a documentary book, you already know what has happened.

Is this book like the first? Some information and some re-telling?
On Location in Blairstown is like a beefed-up version of the first 7 chapters of Making Friday the 13th. There is a lot of info from those chapters that is repeated in this book, and the vast majority of the pictures have been seen before. The main exception to that being several pictures of the campsite and cabins that were taken by various amateur and professional photographers, some of which were in Making Friday the 13th.

I thought I knew all there was to know about the first Friday, but there's quite a bit that I've come across in this new book that was news to me. When I first scanned through the book after I got it on Friday, I thought, "This looks like more of the same old same old," but I really dug into it yesterday and this morning and I'm happy with what I'm reading so far.

The sequels and other slasher films that followed the original F13 are touched upon briefly at the end of the book, and Grove continues to be a little too opinionated for my tastes when he gets to those. That was my major irritant with his previous Friday book. I'm a "just the facts" guy.... keep your opinions to yourself, please. But really, I was expecting that.

All things considered, it's a good book. I'm glad I got it.
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Old 10-25-2013, 06:21 PM   #15
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

http://www.fangoria.com/new/on-locat...h-book-review/


“ON LOCATION IN BLAIRSTOWN: THE MAKING OF FRIDAY THE 13TH” (Book Review)
Author David Grove is a FRIDAY THE 13th superfan who admits such with pride in the introduction to his latest effort, the hefty and illuminating ON LOCATION IN BLAIRSTOWN: THE MAKING OF FRIDAY THE 13th (available now from Author Mike/Dark Ink books). Grove has penned plenty of genre-oriented tomes in his day, including 2004’s well-received MAKING FRIDAY THE 13th: THE LEGEND OF CAMP BLOOD, and the existence of his latest poses the question as to how he could ever best the scope of that well-reviewed initial immersion into the Voorhees universe. the answer is that, instead of trying, Grove focuses here exclusively on producer/director Sean S. Cunningham’s first stab at the slasher franchise exclusively, and does so affectionately – yet objectively - and even stops to muckrake a bit of choice gossip for those that care about such things.

BLAIRSTOWN’s credibility is in check from the first printed words as FX legend Tom Savini pens the foreword, a wry mini-memoir about how the film affected him personally and professionally*. From there on in, it’s Grove’s voice and his key subjects (plenty of F13 alumni are interviewed) taking the reader from the conception to execution to release of the film that Leonard Maltin once famously claimed lowered the SAT scores of young Americans everywhere. The author’s dry, matter-of-fact prose won’t win any awards, but the tales told are fascinating, especially to this writer who admits a less than masterful grasp on the FRIDAY legacy.

Grove claims in his preface that a good portion of the book is made up of new interview material, and though I can’t determine if any of it is recycled from CAMP BLOOD, all of it is compelling, including the aforementioned bit of dirt, in which it is suggested Cunningham knew star Adrienne King in the biblical sense on set. Of course, none of that tabloid nonsense matters, but it’s an interesting aside nonetheless and will make some ardent admirers of the film examine King’s turn a bit differently. Other, less privacy-invading revelations include the fact that most of the cast were never on set together at the same time due to their conflicting schedules, and that Savini himself (who got the gig because of his landmark work on DAWN OF THE DEAD) co-directed and choreographed the climactic brawl between Adrienne King and Betsy Palmer.

And though printed exclusively in black and white (a shame in that one of the 80’s most notorious bloodbaths isn’t realized here in any shade of red, save for the cover) the hundreds of stills—both on set, behind the scenes and new set re-visit images—are a real treat (though many bear the patchy mark of cheap scanning). Grove has also jammed in other essential supplements like the shooting script and schedules, as well as filmographies of all involved.

The highest compliment we can pay a book like BLAIRSTOWN is that its creator genuinely cares, and that level of interest and constructive obsession shines through on every page. FRIDAY THE 13th will always be the dirty cousin of its closest kin, John Carpenter’s masterful slasher blueprint HALLOWEEN, but Grove celebrates that grit. This is a good book about a group of good people making low movies to make money and accidentally creating a classic. Recommended.
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Old 11-24-2013, 03:03 PM   #16
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Default Re: On Location in Blairstown: The Making of Friday the 13th (1980) By David Grove

http://shelf-life.ew.com/2013/11/22/...h-kevin-bacon/
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